Climate Change Conversation with WHOI Scientist

Climate change is real and our options are clear, says WHOI oceanographer Ray Schmitt in a conversation with Oceanus. He served on the National Research Council study group whose new report, America’s Climate Choices, lays out the state of climate science, the steps we should take to combat climate change—and the consequences if we do not.

Science in Service to the Nation
A conversation with oceanographer Ray Schmitt
http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=77226&sectionid=1001

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Glaciers and Ocean Currents, Article and Animation

With many of Greenland’s glaciers rapidly shrinking, WHOI oceanographers ask whether warming ocean currents could be hastening their retreat.  This article and animation from Oceanus explore A Glacier’s Pace: Are ocean currents hastening the retreat of Greenland’s glaciers?
http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=73766&sectionid=1000

Climate Change Online PD Workshop

Oregon State University E-Campus offers Global Climate Change Issues and Impacts Workshop, taught by Vicki Osis.

The course will provide information geared for teachers and general audiences about climate change and impacts of warming that are being expressed in various bioregions of the world. Topics in the course will also include current reports about oil supplies and the concept of peak oil, as well as alternative energy research, development and conservation. Teaching activities will be provided for various topics such as impacts on coral reefs and forests etc. A focus of the course will be how to teach a controversial and scary topic to students.

July 19-August 13, FW 808 1 credit professional development credit. Total Cost $75.00 ($50.00 for 1 credit. $25.00 admission to OSU if you are not an active student.)  Contact Vicki if you wish more information or to receive a syllabus of the course and to enroll in the class.  vjosis@peak.org

Oceans à la Carte: A Workshop for K-12 Educators

University of Rhode Island offers a one-day workshop for educators on May 22 at URI’s Bay Campus.The workshop includes oceanography, marine, and environmental science presentations and workshop sessions for teachers, educators, and homeschool and group leaders.  Choose from a variety of presentations by leading scientists, hands-on activities, and content information sessions. The day will start with a presentation by Chris Deacutis of the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program entitled  “Changing World: A Changing Bay? Water Quality Conditions in Narragansett Bay and Potential Climate-Driven Concerns.”

For more information and registration form visit, http://omp.gso.uri.edu/ompweb/content/educator-training

Lecture: Impact of Climate Change on Ecosystems

Tidal Marsh

Hector Galbraith, Director of the Climate Change and Energy Initiative at Manomet Center for Conservation Services , will speak at the Westport Middle School, Thursday April 29 at 7 p.m. on research regarding the impacts of climate change on our regional ecosystems.

Hector Galbraith is world renowned for his research and expertise on climate change. He currently serves on Governor Patrick’s Advisory Committee on Climate Change Strategies for the Commonwealth. The results of his research have been published in over 60 papers and chapters in books and peer-reviewed journals.

In his presentation, Dr. Galbraith will share insights from his research related to climate change’s impact on ecosystems and science-based strategies for safeguarding wildlife and habitats. The evening will kick off with a brief presentation by Alan Palm of the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE).

The event is supported by the Southeastern Environmental Education Alliance (SEEAL) . The event is cosponsored by the Westport River Watershed Alliance, Mass Audubon Allens Pond Wildlife Sanctuary, and the Westport Fishermen’s Association.

Report – sea level rise and local wetlands management

A recent paper published in Environmental Research Letters describes work to bring land use planners from 100 local governments along the Atlantic coast to create maps distinguishing lands likely to be protected from lands likely to be given up to the rising sea.  From the abstract:   “Based on…land use plans, we estimate that almost 60% of the land below 1 m along the US Atlantic Coast is expected to be developed and thus unavailable for the inland migration of wetlands. Less than 10% of the land below 1 m has been set aside for conservation.” The full report, including maps, is available online.

Undergraduate Fellowships – Climate Change NH, MA, DC

Clean Air, Cool Planet will place a fellow in each of ten organizations around New England and further afield to work on communications, calculations, and actions to address climate change.  Deadline for applications is 1/31/10; informational webinars are scheduled for 1/14/10 and 1/20/10.  For more information and an application, visit CA-CP.